24 June 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Lost Version of Delacroix Masterpiece Goes on View After Being Found in Paris Apartment: French painter Eugène Delacroix did many preparatory works for his 1834 masterpiece, “Women of Algiers in Their Apartment.” One of these preliminary paintings disappeared in 1850 after it was sold to French diplomat Charles-Edgar de Mornay, with whom Delacroix travelled to Algeria with in 1832.

21.06.2019, Smithsonian: Lost Version of Delacroix Masterpiece Goes on View After Being Found in Paris Apartment

Why are so many art collectors opening museums in Spain?: A spate of recently opened museums around the world, often in attention-grabbing architect-designed buildings, includes Walmart heiress Alice Walton’s Crystal Bridges Museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, Dasha Zhukova’s “Garage” in Moscow, and François Pinault’s own-brand gallery in a repurposed 18th-century mansion in the Paris district of Les Halles. According to the art-collecting website Larry’s List, 72 per cent of the world’s 317 private art museums have opened since 2000.

21.06.2019, The Financial Times: Why are so many art collectors opening museums in Spain? 

Nighthawks nabbed – undeclared hoard subject of police raid: Nighthawks (illegal metal detectorists) are a constant problem for archaeologists and the farmers on whose land they illegally trespass. Aside from the offence under the Treasure Act 1996 of failing to declare finds within 14 days of discovery, the loss of context is critical for archaeologists seeking to understand the find as a whole.

20.06.2019, The Institute of Art and Law: Nighthawks nabbed – undeclared hoard subject of police raid 

Record-breaking Martin Brothers grinning crab barred from export: The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport (DCMS) is searching for a UK buyer to pay the asking price of £260,700 (the total price paid by the owner including VAT). On a recommendation from the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest (RCEWA) the crab has been temporarily prevented from export due to its “outstanding aesthetic importance and its significant interest for the study of late Victorian art pottery, the work of the Martin Brothers and of Robert Wallace Martin in particular”.

18.06.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Record-breaking Martin Brothers grinning crab barred from export 

‘They didn’t look old enough’: who filled a French art gallery with fakes?: The Terrus affair represents a new kind of art crime, driven by what one French radio station has called “low-cost fakes”. As it has become harder for forgers to penetrate the top tiers of a global art market saturated with counterfeits – a figure of as many as 50% is often cited – they are thought to have turned to lesser works. Prior to the scandal, a genuine Terrus was not exorbitant, selling for up to €6,000. 15.06.2019, The Guardian: ‘They didn’t look old enough’: who filled a French art gallery with fakes?

United States

U.S. judge rejects Greece bid to dismiss Sotheby’s lawsuit over bronze horse: A U.S. judge last Friday rejected Greece’s effort to dismiss an unusual lawsuit in which Sotheby’s and the owners of an ancient Greek bronze horse sued the country, seeking court permission to put the statue on the auction block.

21.06.2019, Reuters: U.S. judge rejects Greece bid to dismiss Sotheby’s lawsuit over bronze horse 

US Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Glass Artist Dale Chihuly: A federal judge in Seattle has dismissed a lawsuit by a man who claimed to have contributed to paintings by the glass artist Dale Chihuly.

20.06.2019, The New York Times: US Judge Dismisses Lawsuit Against Glass Artist Dale Chihuly 

A US Senator Is Demanding the Smithsonian Remove the Sackler Name From One of Its Major Museums: On Wednesday, US Senator Jeff Merkley of Oregon issued a letter to the Smithsonian’s newly appointed secretary, Lonnie Bunch, requesting that the institution take down the Sackler name from its Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

20.06.2019, Artnet: A US Senator Is Demanding the Smithsonian Remove the Sackler Name From One of Its Major Museums 

20.06.2019, ArtForum News: Senator Jeff Merkley Of Oregon Urges Smithsonian To Remove Sackler Name From Museum 

The Trump administration’s tariffs will not hurt China but they will hurt the US art trade: In a possible reversal of a decision made last September to remove cultural goods of Chinese origin from a list of proposed items subject to tariffs, the Trump administration has once again suggested paintings and drawings, decorative plaques, engravings, sculpture, antiques and collectibles including stamps and coins should be subject to a 25% tariff—up from the previously proposed 10%. It marks yet another escalation in the ongoing US-China trade war.

19.06.2019, The Art Newspaper: The Trump administration’s tariffs will not hurt China but they will hurt the US art trade 

Can Arts Organizations Do a Public Good Simply by Investing Their Money Differently? One Foundation Is Trying to Find Out: As arts institutions in the US and the UK come under increasing fire for their relationships with donors who have controversial business ties, one arts organization thinks activists might be missing the forest for the trees. “While there is a cry about comportment of individuals, it’s not as core to the institution as what the institution is doing with its own money,” says Maxwell Anderson, the president of Souls Grown Deep, a nonprofit dedicated to promoting the work of African American artists from the South

19.06.2019, Artnet: Can Arts Organizations Do a Public Good Simply by Investing Their Money Differently? One Foundation Is Trying to Find Out 

Artist’s copyright infringement suit heads to US Supreme Court: In a case that is due to be argued before the US Supreme Court this fall, a producer and director who filmed the salvaging of an 18th-century pirate ship in North Carolina has sued state officials for infringing on his copyright without his permission and failing to compensate him for his work. The case could have wider repercussions for artists whose work is disseminated by states who invoke “sovereign immunity” to avoid negotiating with the images’ creators.

18.06.2019, The Art Newspaper: Artist’s copyright infringement suit heads to US Supreme Court 

Sotheby’s Announces Definitive Agreement to be Acquired by Patrick Drahi: Sotheby’s announced that it has signed a definitive merger agreement to be acquired by BidFair USA, an entity wholly owned by media and telecom entrepreneur as well as art collector, Patrick Drahi.

17.06.2019, Sotheby’s: Sotheby’s Announces Definitive Agreement to be Acquired by Patrick Drahi 

17.06.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Sotheby’s sold to media entrepreneur and art collector Patrick Drahi in $3.7bn deal 

18.06.2019, The Financial Times: Deal of the art —Drahi brings hammer down on Sotheby’s 19.06.2019, Artnet: What the Sotheby’s Sale Means for the Future of the Art Industry—and How It Reflects a Broader Shift in Global Economics

World

Tutankhamun auction raises questions of provenance: When Christie’s, the French-owned auction house, announced earlier this month that it would auction a 3,000-year-old stone sculpture of Tutankhamun — the most famous of ancient Egypt’s pharaohs — at a London sale in July, alarm bells rang in Cairo. Egypt’s antiquities ministry hastened to announce it was seeking to stop the sale until it had investigated the provenance of the brown quartzite statue, the first of its type to come to market since 1985. Known as the Amun Head it is expected to fetch more than $5m, a high price for the antiquities market.

21.06.2019, The Financial Times: Tutankhamun auction raises questions of provenance

Censorship casts shadow over China’s top film festival: Guests at China’s flagship film festival this week were surprised to find its opening movie had been pulled at the last minute and replaced with a screening of Midnight Cowboy, highlighting the industry’s growing difficulties with Beijing’s draconian censors.

19.06.2019, The Financial Times: Censorship casts shadow over China’s top film festival

Putin grants Russian citizenship to collector Sergei Shchukin’s grandson ahead of blockbuster Pushkin show: André-Marc Delocque-Fourcaud, the grandson of the visionary collector of French Impressionist and Modern art Sergei Shchukin, has been granted Russian citizenship by President Vladimir Putin, coinciding with the opening of a blockbuster exhibition Shchukin: Biography of a Collection at the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts.18.06.2019, The Art Newspaper: Putin grants Russian citizenship to collector Sergei Shchukin’s grandson ahead of blockbuster Pushkin show

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