22 July 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Turner’s Walton Bridges heads to Norwich Castle after being saved for the nation: At the London auction, it sold to an overseas buyer for a premium-inclusive £3.37m against an estimate of £3m-5m. It subsequently became the subject of a temporary export block issued by the government to give UK buyers and institutions the opportunity to match the purchase price and keep it in the country.

19.07.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Turner’s Walton Bridges heads to Norwich Castle after being saved for the nation 

Hitler Looted the Art, Then They Looted Hitler: New research is helping the hunt for missing art, largely amassed by Hitler, then re-stolen by desperate Germans in the closing days of the war.

19.07.2019, The New York Times: Hitler Looted the Art, Then They Looted Hitler 

Austria promises to return ancient artefacts to Russia that were taken as war trophies: The Salzburg Museum plans to return to Russia five grave reliefs and three amphorae shipped home during the Second World War by an Austrian army officer who took them as trophies from a war-damaged museum in the port of Temryuk on the Sea of Azov near the north-eastern coast of the Black Sea.

18.07.2019, The Art Newspaper: Austria promises to return ancient artefacts to Russia that were taken as war trophies 

Chinese artist Ai Weiwei awarded US$258,000 in damages from Volkswagen dealer in Denmark for advertising infringement: A Danish court last Wednesday ordered a Volkswagen dealer to pay Chinese artist Ai Weiwei more than €230,000 (US$258,000) in damages for using one of the artist’s works in an advert without authorisation.

17.07.2019, South China Morning Post: Chinese artist Ai Weiwei awarded US$258,000 in damages from Volkswagen dealer in Denmark for advertising infringement 

17.07.2019, Art News: Ai Weiwei Wins Copyright Lawsuit Against Volkswagen Distributor Skandinavisk Motor 

17.07.2019, Artnet: Ai Weiwei Wins a Legal Battle With Volkswagen Over an Ad That Featured His Refugee-Themed Art Installation Without Permission 

18.07.2019, The World Intellectual Property Review: Ai Weiwei wins pay-out over car ads backdrop 

New sentencing guidelines for criminal damage offences in the UK: From 1st October 2019, damage to heritage assets will, for the first time, be a factor courts must consider when sentencing those convicted of certain arson and criminal damage offences. Following a recent consultation, the UK Sentencing Council published new guidelines on 3rd July, intended to enable courts to take full account of the harm caused by these offences, over and above the direct physical and financial loss. 

17.07.2019, The Institute of Art and Law: New sentencing guidelines for criminal damage offences in the UK 

Following P.A.I.N. Protest in Paris, Louvre Removes Sackler Name: Following Nan Goldin and the activist group P.A.I.N.’s first protest in Europe against the Sackler family and their role in the opioid epidemic, the Louvre has removed the Sackler name from the walls of its museum. 

17.07.2019, Artforum: Following P.A.I.N. Protest In Paris, Louvre Removes Sackler Name

19.07.2019, The Times: Louvre covers up Sackler name on plaques after opioid protests 

18.07.2019, CNN Style: Louvre removes Sackler family name from museum walls amid opioid controversy 

18.07.2019, Le Journal des Arts: Le Louvre « débaptise » l’aile Sackler 

Dealers and collectors win High Court permission for judicial review of ivory ban law: A High Court judge has given the go-ahead for a full hearing on the legality of the controversial Ivory Act, due to usher in a near-total ban on the UK trade in antique ivory when it comes into force later this year.15.07.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Dealers and collectors win High Court permission for judicial review of ivory ban law

United States

NY collector says he was duped into selling Brancusi sculpture: A New York collector has filed a $200m lawsuit against a lawyer whom he claims persuaded him to sell a Brancusi sculpture for only $100,000 with the understanding that he would be amply compensated when it fetched a higher price at a museum or auction house.

19.07.2019, The Art Newspaper: NY collector says he was duped into selling Brancusi sculpture 

Sotheby’s Investors Sue to Block $2.7 Billion BidFair Offer: Two Sotheby’s shareholders are asking a New York judge to block the planned $2.7 billion purchase of the auction house by French telecom titan and art collector Patrick Drahi’s BidFair USA.

19.07.2019, Bloomberg: Sotheby’s Investors Sue to Block $2.7 Billion BidFair Offer 

19.07.2019, Art News: Sotheby’s Shareholders Attempt to Stop $2.7 Billion Purchase of Auction House by BidFair

Eight Artists Withdraw From Whitney Biennial Over Board Member’s Ties to Tear Gas: Eight artists have asked the Whitney Museum of American Art to remove their works from this year’s Biennial, citing what they describe as the museum’s lack of response to calls for the resignation of a board member with ties to the sale of military supplies, including tear gas.

19.07.2019, The New York Times: Eight Artists Withdraw From Whitney Biennial Over Board Member’s Ties to Tear Gas 

15.07.2019, The Art Newspaper: Four artists withdraw their work from the Whitney Biennial

A mystery for the ages: the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist: The walls of the office of Anthony Amore, the chief of security of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston since 2005, are covered with reproductions of all 13 works stolen in one of the biggest unsolved art thefts in history, when two men posing as police officers made off with treasures by Rembrandt, Vermeer, Degas, and Manet on 19 March 1990. At Amore’s home, drawings by his daughters of Rembrandt’s The Storm on the Sea of Galilee, one of the works that was taken, hang on the door of his refrigerator. “I’m still wildly obsessed, more than ever,” he says. “I constantly think about those paintings.”

17.07.2019, The Art Newspaper: A mystery for the ages: the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum heist 

New US visa policy could stifle outspoken artists on social media: Advocacy groups in the US are concerned that the State Department’s new visa policies introduced on 31 May, which require almost all applicants to submit their social media profiles, email addresses and phone numbers from the past five years, could force artists to self-censor.

16.07.2019, The Art Newspaper: New US visa policy could stifle outspoken artists on social media 

The last lawsuit in the Knoedler fakes scandal is close to being settled: Since 2011, Knoedler has fielded ten lawsuits accusing it of knowingly selling fake Abstract Expressionist paintings. Just as the scandal came to light, the once-eminent gallery shut down after 165 years in business. Now, according to papers filed in Manhattan federal court 11 July, the parties in the last active case are in the process of settling their dispute—but if the settlement is not finalised within 45 days, the case could go to trial.

15.07.2019, The Art Newspaper: The last lawsuit in the Knoedler fakes scandal is close to being settled 

Artist Cady Noland Refuses to Give Up Her Legal Fight Over the Restoration of Her Disavowed Log Cabin Sculpture: Is it possible to conserve an artwork so much that it becomes something entirely different? And can you sue someone for such an act? These questions have been put before a federal judge for the third time by the artist Cady Noland, who has filed an appeal in an ongoing dispute over her sculpture Log Cabin (1990). Noland argues that the restoration of the work was so extreme that it amounted to the creation of an unauthorized copy of the original. A judge dismissed her lawsuit on March 8 but gave the artist the chance to replead her case one final time.15.07.2019, Artnet: Artist Cady Noland Refuses to Give Up Her Legal Fight Over the Restoration of Her Disavowed Log Cabin Sculpture.

World

Benin gets €20m loan for new museum to show restituted heritage: Benin is preparing a new home in the city of Abomey for 26 objects of art and cultural heritage looted by French troops in 1894, which France’s president Emmanuel Macron pledged last November to return to the West African country. The institution is due to open in 2021, on the 116-acre Unesco World Heritage site of the royal palaces of the former Kingdom of Dahomey, the AFP reports. The French Development Agency, the public funding group that supports the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals, will loan €20m towards construction.

18.07.2019, The Art Newspaper: Benin gets €20m loan for new museum to show restituted heritage 

16.07.2019, France 24: Benin readies for return of treasures taken by France 

Turkish Artist Zehra Doğan Detained in Berlin: Artist and activist Zehra Doğan, who was recently incarcerated in Turkey for painting the destruction of a Kurdish city by the military, was detained in Berlin along with several collaborators on Saturday, July 13 for participating in an unauthorized public performance-art piece at the city’s Pergamon Museum.

18.07.2019, Artforum: Turkish Artist Zehra Doğan Detained In Berlin

Latest Returned 1MDB Loot Includes ‘King Kong’ Poster, Art: A vintage French “King Kong” poster, a Jean-Michel Basquiat drawing, and several luxury watches are among the latest haul of returned treasures that were allegedly bought with money stolen from the Malaysian 1MDB state fund.16.07.2019, Bloomberg: Latest Returned 1MDB Loot Includes ‘King Kong’ Poster, Art

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