21 January 2019

Europe

Experts pour cold water on Klimt discovery in Hungary: The unveiling this week of an Art Nouveau plaster relief, said to have been designed by Gustav Klimt, carried all the hallmarks of an intriguing story of artistic discovery. But the possibility of a connection to Klimt has been dismissed by two leading authorities on the artist. 

18.01.2019, The Art Newspaper: Experts pour cold water on Klimt discovery in Hungary  

Defra issues import and export warning for CITES-listed natural history specimens in the event of a No deal Brexit: In a notice sent out by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) it warned of changes to the transit of CITES-listed items. It said in the “event of a No deal EU exit… CITES-listed animals and plants would require permits to travel between the UK and the EU, and would only be able to travel through certain ports”. 

17.01.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Defra issues import and export warning for CITES-listed natural history specimens in the event of a No deal Brexit  

‘Michelangelo’ stolen from church days before checks: A 16th-century artwork has been stolen from a Flemish church days before it was to be examined to determine if it was Belgium’s only work by Michelangelo. 

15.01.2019, The Times: ‘Michelangelo’ stolen from church days before checks 

Government issues export bar for 18th century harpsichord in hope of finding UK buyer: The UK government hopes a UK buyer can be found to match the £85,560 that the owner paid for the harpsichord last year. The instrument by renowned maker Joseph Mahoon has been temporarily blocked from export by Michael Ellis, minister for arts, heritage and tourism, following a recommendation by the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest (RCEWA) administered by The Arts Council. 

15.01.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Government issues export bar for 18th century harpsichord in hope of finding UK buyer  

Keeping up to date with CITES: An update from expert Kim McDonald of The Taxidermy Law Company: Good reputations are often hard fought but through ignorance can be lost in a short space of time. It is therefore imperative that traders keep a close watch on the listings from CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species) and the regular changes to UK government policies that can slip in seemingly unnoticed. 

14.01.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Keeping up to date with CITES: An update from expert Kim McDonald of The Taxidermy Law Company  

Natural history specimens: Article 10 numbers now essential in catalogue descriptions: Under a recently enacted law – the Control of Trade in Endangered Species Regulations 2018 – it is essential to include the reference number of certificates alongside any catalogue description, listing or advertisement. 

14.01.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Natural history specimens: Article 10 numbers now essential in catalogue descriptions  

Looted ‘cannibal’ bowl will not travel to Quai Branly in Paris for Oceania exhibition: The only undisputedly looted object in the Royal Academy of Art’s recent Oceania exhibition will not be going to Paris—the second venue for the show, where it opens at the Musée du Quai Branly-Jacques Chirac this spring. The unique and intricately carved ceremonial feast trough was seized by a British naval force in the Solomon Islands in 1891. 

14.01.2019, The Art Newspaper: Looted ‘cannibal’ bowl will not travel to Quai Branly in Paris for Oceania exhibition 

Dutch Royal family’s decision to auction $2.5m Rubens drawing at Sotheby’s sparks criticism: The Dutch prime minister says he will not intervene in the Dutch royal family’s decision to sell a chalk drawing by Peter Paul Rubens at Sotheby’s New York, according to Salima Belhaj, a member of the liberal D66 party. The sketch is estimated to fetch $2.5m-$3.5m on 30 January. 

14.01.219, The Art Newspaper: Dutch Royal family’s decision to auction $2.5m Rubens drawing at Sotheby’s sparks criticism  

United States

His Art, Their Ideas: Did Robert Indiana Lose Control of His Work?: Private text messages entered as evidence in a legal dispute raise new questions about whether the artist fully designed his final works. 

18.01.2019, The New York Times: His Art, Their Ideas: Did Robert Indiana Lose Control of His Work? 

Jackson Pollock Is Perhaps the Most-Forged Postwar Artist. This Man Wants to Identify the Fakes: In 2007, hedge fund manager Pierre Lagrange bought a silver drip painting by Jackson Pollock for $17 million from Knoedler Gallery. Four years later, he found out the painting was a fake. 

17.01.2019, Artnet: Jackson Pollock Is Perhaps the Most-Forged Postwar Artist. This Man Wants to Identify the Fakes  

Gallery takes legal action against Christie’s over private sale of Francis Bacon painting: The case filed earlier this month by a South Korean gallery over a Francis Bacon painting that it consigned to be sold via private treaty claims that Christie’s acted unreasonably by eventually trying to offload the work below its market value. 

16.01.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Gallery takes legal action against Christie’s over private sale of Francis Bacon painting 

Introducing ‘Opportunity Zones’: The Trump Administration’s New Tax Break for Art Collectors: Can a new tax break for art collectors replace a prized benefit that was stripped from the books last year? One year after Congress killed a wildly popular provision favored by art flippers, a new tax benefit has emerged under the Trump administration’s tax plan, so-called “Opportunity Zones,” which came into effect in late December 2017. These zones are economically distressed communities where new investments may be eligible for preferred tax treatment. The first set of Opportunity Zones were designated this past April, and now appear in parts of all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and five US territories. In New York state, numerous sections of the Bronx, Albany, Erie, and Dutchess county are designated. 

14.01.2019, Artnet: Introducing ‘Opportunity Zones’: The Trump Administration’s New Tax Break for Art Collectors  

World

Hidden in plain sight: Tokyo probes possible 10-year-old Banksy artwork: Banksy artworks invariably draw widespread attention when they are discovered, and now authorities in Tokyo are looking into whether the elusive street artist may have also left their mark on the Japanese capital. 

18.01.2019, CNN Style: Hidden in plain sight: Tokyo probes possible 10-year-old Banksy artwork 

Aliph, the global fund to protect cultural heritage, announces its first projects in Iraq and Mali: Aliph, a Geneva-based global fund to protect cultural heritage in war zones, spearheaded by France and the United Arab Emirates and chaired by the American billionaire Thomas Kaplan, has revealed its first projects. They include the Mosul museum and the Behnam monastery in Iraq, as well as the Tomb of Askia in Gao, Mali. The organisation has also launched a worldwide call for new projects. 

16.01.2019, The Art Newspaper: Aliph, the global fund to protect cultural heritage, announces its first projects in Iraq and Mali 

Senegal’s Museum of Black Civilizations Welcomes Some Treasures Home: The 19th-century sword rests in a glass case alongside a frail Quran in a spacious gallery where scrolls hang from the wall and soft religious chanting is piped in. The saber’s etched copper handle is shaped like a swan’s beak, with a ring at the end. Its leather sheath rests nearby. 

15.01.2019, The New York Times: Senegal’s Museum of Black Civilizations Welcomes Some Treasures Home 

What can museums do to ensure collectors follow through on promised gifts?: The recent sale at auction of Chop Suey (1929) by Edward Hopper, once promised to Seattle Art Museum, is a reminder of the delicate if sometimes awkward balance between announced gifts to museums and later changes of heart. The episode is an opportunity to review best practices and pitfalls when it comes to the planned giving of art, particularly for major collections. 

14.01.2019, Apollo: What can museums do to ensure collectors follow through on promised gifts?  

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