2 September 2020

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Art market will be given more time to register under Money Laundering Directive: Originally the deadline was set for January 2021. However, the Treasury is planning to delay this until June 10, 2021, to give more time due to issues arising from the coronavirus pandemic. The 5th Money Laundering Directive (known as 5MLD) took effect on January 10 this year. It requires auction houses, art galleries and dealerships to conduct stricter due diligence on buyers who purchase from them works of art above a threshold of €10,000. 

31.08.2020, The Antiques Trade GazetteArt market will be given more time to register under Money Laundering Directive  

‘Fake’ Rembrandt came from artist’s workshop and is possibly genuine: A tiny painting of a weary, melancholic old man long rejected as a fake and consigned to a museum basement has been revealed as one from Rembrandt’s workshop, and possibly by the man himself. 

30.08.2020, The Guardian‘Fake’ Rembrandt came from artist’s workshop and is possibly genuine  

‘Be commercially minded or lose future funding’: UK government’s threat puts museums in peril: Following the UK government’s £1.57bn support package for arts and heritage organisations announced in July, it has now warned museums that they must make greater efforts to commercialise their operations if they are to continue to rely on state support. In a letter leaked to The Art Newspaper, the culture secretary Oliver Dowden has urged museum directors to “take as commercially-minded an approach as possible, pursuing every opportunity to maximise alternative sources of income”. If they don’t, he warns, “I will not be in a position to make the case for any further financial support for the sector.” 

28.08.2020, The Art Newspaper‘Be commercially minded or lose future funding’: UK government’s threat puts museums in peril  

28.08.2020, ArtforumStrings attached: UK warns museums to adopt profit-driven approach or lose funding 

Frans Hals painting stolen from Dutch museum for the third time: The 17th-century painting Two Laughing Boys with a Mug of Beer by the Dutch old master Frans Hals has been stolen for a third time, say Dutch police. The work, made around 1626, was taken from the Hofje van Aerden museum in Leerdam, located in the centre of the Netherlands. 

28.08.2020, The Art NewspaperFrans Hals painting stolen from Dutch museum for the third time  

27.08.2020, ArtnetThieves purloin a Frans Hals painting valued at $17 million from a Dutch museum—for the third time  

27.08.2020, The New York Times17th-century Dutch painting is stolen. Again.  

28.08.2020, Smithsonian MagazineThieves steal 17th-century masterpiece for third time in 32 years  

28.08.2020, Le Journal des ArtsPays-Bas : un Frans Hals volé pour la troisième fois dans un musée  

Certosa di Trisulti: Court maintained the controversial lease: The Administrative Regional Court of Lazio (TAR Lazio) has now ruled on the dispute over the controversial lease of Certosa di Trisulti. The Dignitatis Humanae Institute (DHI) has been allowed to maintain the lease and management of this public cultural heritage site in Italy. 

27.08.2020, The Institute of Art and LawCertosa di Trisulti: Court maintained the controversial lease  

Painting attributed to van Gogh contested by experts ahead of sale in Germany: Despite questions over who really produced the work, a painting attributed to Vincent van Gogh is headed to sale at the German auction house Dechow. The work, titled The Wijk Mill, has been rejected by the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, which is considered the foremost authority on the artist. 

26.08.2020, Art NewsPainting attributed to van Gogh contested by experts ahead of sale in Germany

United States

Keith Haring’s personal art collection to be auctioned for charity: Owning a private collection of nearly 140 artworks by luminaries like Jean-Michel Basquiat, Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein would be a godsend for most arts organizations, but it was a burden for the Keith Haring Foundation. Legal counsel had warned the nonprofit for years that keeping a collection made by artists other than its founder might fail to serve its charitable purpose. So last year the foundation began arranging with Sotheby’s to sell the artworks in an online auction called “Dear Keith,” with all proceeds benefiting the Center, an L.G.B.T.Q. community organization in the West Village. 

31.08.2020, The New York TimesKeith Haring’s personal art collection to be auctioned for charity 

A union representing Museum of Natural History workers is suing the institution over an allegedly invasive health-screening policy: District Council 37, the union representing hundreds of workers at New York’s American Museum of Natural History, has filed a legal complaint against the institution in protest of the mandated use of an app to track employees’ health and possible COVID-19 symptoms. 

27.08.2020, ArtnetA union representing Museum of Natural History workers is suing the institution over an allegedly invasive health-screening policy 

26.08.2020, The New York TimesNatural History Museum union files complaint over Coronavirus app  

Whitney cancels show that included works bought at fund-raisers: The Whitney Museum of American Art cancelled an upcoming exhibition after artists of colour objected to the institution’s having obtained their work through discounted sales largely meant to benefit racial justice charities. They have accused the museum of trying to capitalize on their work without properly compensating them. 

25.08.2020, The New York TimesWhitney cancels show that included works bought at fund-raisers 

25.08.2020, ArtforumWhitney Museum cancels show amid artists’ outcry over acquisition 

28.08.2020, Le Journal des ArtsLe Whitney Museum annule son exposition de réouverture face à la colère des artistes

World

Why we should be concerned about President Erdogan turning museums into mosques: Hagia Sophia and the Chora Church will remain “open to all”, Turkish government promises—but restricted access may not be the primary worry.  

27.08.2020, The Art NewspaperWhy we should be concerned about President Erdogan turning museums into mosques 

A band of illegal gold miners have completely destroyed an ancient Kush settlement in Sudan: Jabal Maragha, an ancient archaeological site in Sudan, is no more. Gold hunters, digging illegally, have destroyed the historic landmark, erasing nearly every trace of what was a small settlement or checkpoint dating to the Kingdom of Kush’s Meroitic period, from 350 BC to 350 AD. 

26.08.2020, ArtnetA band of illegal gold miners have completely destroyed an ancient Kush settlement in Sudan

NOTE: Please note that most excerpts come from the original publication and any credit must go to the author of the publication, not to Constantine Cannon LLP.  Any views or opinions expressed in the excerpts and/or articles belong solely to the author of the publication.  Constantine Cannon LLP does not approve or endorse any view or opinion contained therein.  Due to some copyright restrictions, please doot redistribute this email without our consent.  Should you like to include someone in the mailing list, please let us know.  We will be happy to do it! If you do not wish to receive the Art Law News Update, please unsubscribe through the link below.