19 August 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

London art market braced for no-deal Brexit tax hikes: The London art market is bracing itself for international galleries and collectors to move works out of the UK in the run-up to Brexit, as concern mounts that a no-deal departure would increase the cost and hassle of transporting masterpieces.

16.08.2019, The Financial Times: London art market braced for no-deal Brexit tax hikes 

Liverpool World Museum used facial recognition technology on visitors to Terracotta Warriors show: Officials at the World Museum in Liverpool say they scanned visitors with facial recognition surveillance during the exhibition China’s First Emperor and the Terracotta Warriors, which ran last year (9 February-28 October), and may use the technology in the future. The surveillance measures were put in place because of a heightened security risk, the museum says.

16.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Liverpool World Museum used facial recognition technology on visitors to Terracotta Warriors show 

Time for a New Look at Nazi Art: The extensive property in the Spandau district of Berlin is surrounded by high fences, covered by undergrowth and includes a number of rather plain storage buildings. Two of them are used to store art and they contain hundreds of paintings, many of which were admired by Hitler. Not a few of them even belonged to him.14.08.2019, The Spiegel: Time for a New Look at Nazi Art

United States

The American Museum Is in Crisis: Most art world squabbles never make it past the echoes of galleries, but a recent series of scandals and protests have spilled into the mainstream, plunging some of the world’s greatest museums into a crisis that hasn’t been seen since the furor of the 1980s culture wars.

15.08.2019, Bloomberg: The American Museum Is in Crisis

10 Percent Tariff On Chinese Art And Antiquities Will Take Effect September 1: As the trade war between the United States and China continues, President Trump announced on Tuesday that he plans to delay the implementation of a new tax on a variety of Chinese-made consumer goods, pushing it back from September to December. However, art and antiquities—including paintings, drawings, and sculptures—did not make the list and will be hit with a 10 percent tax beginning September 1.

15.08.2019, Artforum: 10 Percent Tariff On Chinese Art And Antiquities Will Take Effect September 1

14.08.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Art is back on Trump’s China tariff list 

14.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Trump delays tariffs on Chinese goods until December—but not for art and antiquities 

US antiques dealer lawsuit against New York’s ivory ban gets green light to proceed: The lawsuit, a long-running case mounted by the Art and Antique Dealers League of America and the National Art and Antiques Dealers Association of America, has been allowed to proceed on the grounds that the ban unconstitutionally restricts ‘commercial speech’.

15.08.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: US antiques dealer lawsuit against New York’s ivory ban gets green light to proceed 

Robert Indiana’s Estate Says Artist’s Caretaker Neglected Him: Since Robert Indiana’s death last year, a former business partner and his caretaker have feuded bitterly over whether the caretaker had taken advantage of the artist in the final years of his life at home on a remote island in Maine.

14.08.2019, The New York Times Robert Indiana’s Estate Says Artist’s Caretaker Neglected Him 

Nazi-looted French vases returned jointly by FBI and Christie’s: The vases were consigned to Christie’s New York by an unnamed source but it was discovered through the due diligence process, which included checking lost art databases, that the pieces were part of the unrestituted property that had belonged to Lucie Mayer-Fuld in the 1930s. The pair were valued at $120,000.12.08.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Nazi-looted French vases returned jointly by FBI and Christie’s

World

Stolen artefacts from ‘prolific art smuggler’ returned to India: Two artefacts, linked to one of the world’s largest smuggling rings, have been repatriated to India through a joint US-UK operation.

16.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Stolen artefacts from ‘prolific art smuggler’ returned to India

The razing of mosques is the next step in China’s crackdown on Uyghur culture: Last week a joint report by the Guardian and Bellingcat revealed that since 2016 more than two dozen Islamic religious sites have been partially or totally demolished in Xinjiang, a western region in China whose largest ethnic group, the Uyghurs, are predominantly Muslim. Analysis of satellite imagery, corroborated by reports from local residents, shows that many mosques have had domes, minarets and gatehouses removed, while others have been razed completely. Several religious shrines, such as the one devoted to Imam Asim, which for centuries has attracted thousands of pilgrims, have also been demolished.

16.08.2019, Apollo Magazine: The razing of mosques is the next step in China’s crackdown on Uyghur culture

Art Disappears in Private Hands. Can Social Media Resurface It?: Private art collections are notoriously secretive, but a collective website is aiming to make them viewable by all. The private art collection of Roberto Toscano and his wife, Nadia Toscano-Palon, features works by artists including Daniel Turner, Anish Kapoor, James Turrell and Oscar Tuazon. Since 2012, the collection has grown to more than 100 works, which are partly in storage because of renovations — and, like most private collections, are rarely seen by anyone outside of the couple’s immediate circle.

14.08.2019, The New York Times: Art Disappears in Private Hands. Can Social Media Resurface It? 

Cuban Artist Luis Manuel Otero Alcántara Arrested Over Performance With Cuban Flag: Cuban artist Luis Manuel Otero Alcántara, a staunch activist for artistic freedom in the country, was arrested outside the Museum of Dissidence in Havana on Saturday, August 10 and released two days later. Alcántara has previously been harassed and detained by the police on numerous occasions for his involvement in the campaign against Decree 349, the legislation that restricts independent cultural activity on the island.13.08.2019, Artforum: Cuban Artist Luis Manuel Otero Alcántara Arrested Over Performance With Cuban Flag

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