14 April 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Kamel Mennour to show controversial ‘rediscovered’ Caravaggio in Paris gallery: The painting of Judith beheading Holofernes, somewhat controversially attributed to Caravaggio by the consultant and Old Masters specialist Eric Turquin, will go on show at Galerie Kamel Mennour (rue du Pont de Lodi) in Paris this week. The piece will be shown alongside French artist Daniel Buren’s site-specific work, Pyramidal, haut-relief – A5, travail (2017) in a “face to face” presentation, lit by the designer Madjid Hakimi. 

12.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: Kamel Mennour to show controversial ‘rediscovered’ Caravaggio in Paris gallery  

Petition launched to remove ‘racist’ anti-slavery fresco in France’s National Assembly: A fresco by Hervé Di Rosa in France’s National Assembly commemorating the abolition of slavery is the subject of a petition demanding its removal 28 years after it was installed. The artist has angrily branded this demand as “censorship”. Depicting two figures with black faces, bulging blue eyes, curly hair and oversized, bright red lips, the fresco is part of a series of murals by Di Rosa relating to French history. For the past few days, it has sparked a fierce debate. 

11.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: Petition launched to remove ‘racist’ anti-slavery fresco in France’s National Assembly  

09.04.2019, Le Journal des Arts: Un tableau de Di Rosa à l’Assemblée Nationale est-il raciste ?  

Court case over ‘modern forgery’ Frans Hals concludes but judgment reserved until summer: Throughout a day and a half of questioning in London’s Commercial Court last week, James Martin stood by his assertion that a portrait signed Frans Hals sold via Sotheby’s in 2011 to an American collector for $11.75m is “without any doubt a modern forgery.” 

11.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: Court case over ‘modern forgery’ Frans Hals concludes but judgment reserved until summer  

EU adopts new rules on cultural heritage imports: The European Council adopted new rules to clamp down on the illicit trafficking in cultural goods, including a requirement for import licences on artefacts more than 250 years old. 

10.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: EU adopts new rules on cultural heritage imports  

Export bar issued for 350-year-old £3m Baroque cabinet made by Papal craftsman: The German furniture-maker was Rome’s leading cabinet maker during the 1660s and 1670s and worked for successive Popes and a number of leading Italian families after settling in Rome in 1655 where he entered the papal service.   

09.04.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: Export bar issued for 350-year-old £3m Baroque cabinet made by Papal craftsman  

UK moves up to second place in global art market as China’s growth slows: The UK reported sales up 8% to just under $14bn in 2018, leading to a 1% gain in market share to 21%. The performance helped it return to second place in the Art Basel and UBS Global Art Market Report table. 

08.04.2019, Antiques Trade Gazette: UK moves up to second place in global art market as China’s growth slows  

Rediscovered masterpiece ‘was actually work of Malevich’s pupil’: Billed as a rediscovered masterpiece by Kazimir Malevich, the portrait of a bohemian Russian woman holding a red bag was the charismatic star of a London exhibition in 2014. Critics picked out the image for special praise in the Tate Modern show dedicated to the avant-garde painter. 

07.04.2019, The Guardian: Rediscovered masterpiece ‘was actually work of Malevich’s pupil’

United States

Guggenheim ‘decommissions’ conceptual and Minimalist works over questions of authenticity: For nine years, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum has been foraging for answers to some of the most confounding questions raised by Minimalist and conceptual art from the 1960s and 70s: What makes a work genuine? If an artist decides he prefers an earlier or later iteration of his original work, which one should have pride of place in a museum? If an artist disowns a work altogether, how should the museum label and classify it? 

11.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: Guggenheim ‘decommissions’ conceptual and Minimalist works over questions of authenticity  

FBI launches campaign to return haul of Native and South American works: The Federal Bureau of Investigation’s (FBI) art crime team is seeking help to return thousands of objects, works of art and Native American human remains that it seized in 2014 in Waldron, Indiana, from the property of the late ethnographic collector Don Miller. Officials confiscated around 8,000 pieces from a trove of more than 40,000 objects from various cultures, with around a third of the collection comprising Native American art works and human bones. “The sheer size of the collection and human remains was shocking”, says FBI special agent Tim Carpenter. “It’s unfortunate, but not uncommon, to find some human remains in these types of seizures, but we were certainly not prepared for what we found”. 

10.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: FBI launches campaign to return haul of Native and South American works  

A Republican Lawmaker Just Introduced a Bill to Cut All Funding for Art in US Embassies: Congressman Tim Burchett, a Republican from Tennessee, has introduced a new bill to stop the government from spending any money on art for overseas US embassies. 

09.04.2019, Artnet: A Republican Lawmaker Just Introduced a Bill to Cut All Funding for Art in US Embassies  

A Donor Removed the Portland Museum From Her Will Just Before Her Death. Now, the Museum Is Suing Her Caretaker: Months before her death in 2015, art collector Eleanor G. Potter amended her will to remove the Portland Museum of Art as the primary beneficiary of up to $2 million. Instead, she gave the majority of her estate to her caretaker at the time, a woman named AnneMarie Germain. Now, the museum is suing Germain, accusing her of “elder abuse.” 

09.04.2019, Artnet: A Donor Removed the Portland Museum From Her Will Just Before Her Death. Now, the Museum Is Suing Her Caretaker  

World

The oligarch, the Saudi prince and the Salvator Mundi – the world’s most expensive painting: Nothing in the known universe, no item, object or quantity of material, has ever appreciated in value as fast as the Salvator Mundi. Only reattributed to Leonardo da Vinci in 2011, it is widely said to be “the Last Leonardo”. The 66cm high and 45cm wide Renaissance painting of Christ was discovered in May 2005 by two small-time art dealers, Alex Parish and Robert Simon, who paid $1,175 for it – a sum considerably less than the figure of “around $10,000” the pair later quoted to the media. In 2013 they sold it for $80 million, then four years later, in 2017 – a mere 12 years and 6 months after it was sold for not much more than $1,000 – it was auctioned by Christie’s New York for $450 million (£342 million). 

13.10.2019, The Times: The oligarch, the Saudi prince and the Salvator Mundi – the world’s most expensive painting  

Activist artist arrested on eve of Havana Biennial: As the Havana Biennial opened today, tensions between artists and the Cuban government continued to dominate the conversation. The Cuban activist artist Luis Manuel Otero Alcántara, who was involved in various actions against censorship in Cuba, was arrested outside his home in Havana the previous day, for the second time in one week. Meanwhile, the Cuban-American artist Coco Fusco was denied entry to Cuba. 

12.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: Activist artist arrested on eve of Havana Biennial 

Indigenous human remains returned to Australia by five German institutions: The remains of 53 indigenous ancestors will be returned to Australia by five German institutions at ceremonies in Munich, Stuttgart and Berlin over the coming days, the latest in a series of repatriations of bones and skulls acquired by museums and universities in the 19th and early 20th centuries. 

10.04.2019, The Art Newspaper: Indigenous human remains returned to Australia by five German institutions  

Coco Fusco Denied Entry to Cuba Ahead of Havana Biennial: As Cuba welcomes visitors to the Havana Biennial opening on Friday, one artist has been denied entry to the country. The New York–based Cuban-American artist Coco Fusco traveled last Wednesday to attend the 13th edition of the biennial, which will include 83 artists from 45 countries under the title “the construction of the possible.” But when she landed at José Martí Airport, she was detained by customs officials and turned away. 

10.04.2019, Artnews: Coco Fusco Denied Entry to Cuba Ahead of Havana Biennial  

12.04.2019, Le Journal des Arts: Une artiste cubaine interdite d’entrer dans son pays  

‘It Is a Culture of Fear’: Formerly Imprisoned Photographer Shahidul Alam on Art, Protest, and the Political Climate in Bangladesh: Last year, when the Bangladeshi photographer Shahidul Alam was jailed by his government, his case became a cause célèbre, sparking protests, drawing attention to the parlous political situation in Bangladesh, and becoming a symbol of the fight for freedom of speech internationally. But while he is recognized as a powerhouse in photography circles, for more than a few observers, the uproar was their first exposure to his work. 

09.04.2019, Artnet: ‘It Is a Culture of Fear’: Formerly Imprisoned Photographer Shahidul Alam on Art, Protest, and the Political Climate in Bangladesh

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