13 May 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Locked out via legal loophole: artists evicted from London studios following ‘administrative error’: Twenty-five London-based artists have been locked out of their studios in Perivale, West London, after an “administrative error” by the studio providers apparently caused the landlords to repossess the building. The Association for Cultural Advancement through Visual Art (ACAVA), which until Thursday 2 May was the leaseholder of Stewkley House Studios, failed to make a rent payment due at the end of March. This triggered a clause in the building’s lease agreement which allows the landlords to occupy the site if the rent is paid more than 21 days late.

09.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: Locked out via legal loophole: artists evicted from London studios following ‘administrative error’

Italian galleries no longer have to pay artist royalties on primary market sales: Primary market galleries in Italy no longer have to pay the artist’s resale right (ARR) when selling a work for the first time on behalf of an artist, meaning only works being resold are subject to royalties.

08.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: Italian galleries no longer have to pay artist royalties on primary market sales 

A Long-Lost Cupid Is Revealed Under the Surface of One of Vermeer’s Greatest Paintings: Johannes Vermeer’s Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window was not alone. Experts are currently uncovering an image of a large cupid that was hanging on the wall behind her.

08.09.2019, Artnet: A Long-Lost Cupid Is Revealed Under the Surface of One of Vermeer’s Greatest Paintings 

07.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: Hidden Cupid resurfaces in one of Vermeer’s best-known works after two and a half centuries 

09.05.2019, Le Journal des Arts: Un cupidon caché dans une peinture de Vermeer refait surface 

Italy denies it offered to lend Leonardo Da Vinci works to Louvre: Italy has rejected French claims that it agreed to lend works by Leonardo da Vinci for an exhibition at the Louvre, escalating hostilities between Rome and Paris over the artist.

06.05.2019, The Times: Italy denies it offered to lend Leonardo Da Vinci works to Louvre 

Venice Is Introducing an Entry Tax to Help Pay for the Damage Tourists Wreak, Beginning During This Year’s Biennale: Authorities in Venice are introducing an entry fee to the city in a bid to offset the costs of damage incurred by the masses of tourists that inundate the floating city each year. The fee will take effect on September 1, toward the end of this year’s Venice Biennale, adding an additional cost of €3 to €10 to the already pricey endeavor of taking in the monumental exhibition.

06.05.2019, Artnet: Venice Is Introducing an Entry Tax to Help Pay for the Damage Tourists Wreak, Beginning During This Year’s Biennale 

Saatchi Gallery covers up artworks after Muslim visitors’ complaints: The leading contemporary art gallery covered up works featuring an Islamic declaration of faith after complaints from Muslim visitors who said the artworks were blasphemous.05.05.2019, The Guardian: Saatchi Gallery covers up artworks after Muslim visitors’ complaints

United States

Knoedler owner Michael Hammer may be liable for fraud over fakes, New York judge finds: In a warning shot to gallery owners, a Manhattan federal judge has sent to trial two collectors’ claims that Michael Hammer and his company 831 Holdings, which owned the now closed Knoedler gallery, are liable for fraud the gallery allegedly committed in selling forgeries.

10.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: Knoedler owner Michael Hammer may be liable for fraud over fakes, New York judge finds

One of Nelson Mandela’s first sketches sells for $90,000: One of the first sketches made by Nelson Mandela (1918-2013), recalling the former South Africa president’s 27 years of imprisonment, was among the top-selling works at Bonhams’ relaunched African art auction in New York. “The Cell Door, Robben Island” (2002) was sold by Mandela’s daughter, Pumla Makaziwe Mandela, and went for its top estimate of $90,000 on May 2.

10.05.2019, The Financial Times: One of Nelson Mandela’s first sketches sells for $90,000 

Collectors sued the legendary gallery Wildenstein & Co. over a forged Pierre Bonnard painting.: A lawsuit was filed Tuesday in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York by the trust of an art collector alleging that Wildenstein & Co., the legendary Upper East Side gallery that for decades was a global Impressionist and Modern powerhouse, sold the late collector a fake painting by Pierre Bonnard it passed off as authentic in 1985. The purchase price at the time was $275,000, and the plaintiff is asking for that sum, plus $50,000 spent out-of-pocket to get the work authenticated.

09.05.2019, Artsy: Collectors sued the legendary gallery Wildenstein & Co. over a forged Pierre Bonnard painting. 

10.09.2019, Artnet: A High-Profile Impressionist Art Collector Says Wildenstein Sold Him a ‘Clever Fake’ Bonnard—and Now the Courts Will Decide 

Money, Ethics, Art: Can Museums Police Themselves?: For generations Americans tended to see art museums as alternatives to crass everyday life. Like libraries, they were for learning; like churches, for reflection. You went to them for a hit of Beauty and a lesson in “eternal values,” embodied in relics of the past donated by civic-minded angels. You probably didn’t know — and most museums weren’t going to tell you — that many of those relics were stolen goods. 

09.05.2019, The New York Times: Money, Ethics, Art: Can Museums Police Themselves?

Fake German Heiress Sentenced to 4-12 Years Behind Bars: Anna Sorokin, the German con artist who passed herself off as a wealthy heiress to swindle banks, hotels and even close friends, was sentenced last Thursday to four to 12 years in prison.

09.05.2019, Bloomberg: Fake German Heiress Sentenced to 4-12 Years Behind Bars 

Val Kilmer denied claims he copied another artist’s work when making a bronze tumbleweed.: Actor-turned-artist Val Kilmer is fighting a lawsuit brought by Texas-based artist Bale Creek Allen, who claims the Top Gun star infringed on his copyright by creating a bronze tumbleweed sculpture strikingly similar to his own work.09.05.2019, Artsy: Val Kilmer denied claims he copied another artist’s work when making a bronze tumbleweed.

World

Uzbekistan’s troubled Nukus Museum embroiled in new row: The director of Uzbekistan’s Nukus Museum, home to the prized Savitsky collection of Russian avant-garde art, is accusing the ministry of culture of advertising her job behind her back. 08.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: Uzbekistan’s troubled Nukus Museum embroiled in new row

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