12 November 2018

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Jeff Koons loses French lawsuit over ‘slavish copy’ of Naf Naf advert: Jeff Koons has been found guilty of plagiarising a 1980s advertising campaign for French fashion brand Naf Naf to make his porcelain sculpture Fait d’Hiver (1988), which is part of his Banality series. 

09.11.2018, The Art NewspaperJeff Koons loses French lawsuit over ‘slavish copy’ of Naf Naf advert  

09.11.2018, ArtnetJeff Koons Is Found Guilty of Plagiarism in Paris and Ordered to Pay $168,000 to the Creator of an Ad He Appropriated  

8 Artists at the Paris Photo Fair Who Show Where Photography Is Going: The world’s largest photography show features works that go far beyond traditional two-dimensional prints. Some were even made without a camera. 

09.11.2018, The New York Times8 Artists at the Paris Photo Fair Who Show Where Photography Is Going  

In Search of the Real Thing: China’s Quest to Buy Back Its Lost Heritage: Perceptions of the art market can often be shaped by the huge prices paid for work by the West’s most famous painters and sculptors. But there is another culture that can also inspire spectacular sales. 

09.11.2018, The New York TimesIn Search of the Real Thing: China’s Quest to Buy Back Its Lost Heritage  

Berlin’s Cultural Institutions Unite to Fight Far-Right Nationalists in Germany: Berlin’s museums, theaters, art galleries, and cultural spaces have joined forces in an unprecedented show of solidarity against the rise of right-wing groups across Germany. More than 140 figures representing cultural institutions denounced “illegitimate attempts made by right-wing nationalists to exploit art and cultural events for their own purposes,” in a declaration launched on November 9. 

09.11.2018, ArtnetBerlin’s Cultural Institutions Unite to Fight Far-Right Nationalists in Germany  

Austrian culture minister Gernot Blümel ‘is a no-show’, claims opposition: Austrian opposition lawmakers have accused Gernot Blümel, the culture minister appointed in January, of causing a standstill in cultural policy and neglecting his duties by failing to schedule parliamentary meetings or defend artists under attack. 

07.11.2018, The Art NewspaperAustrian culture minister Gernot Blümel ‘is a no-show’, claims opposition  

Tefaf drops dealers and auction house specialists from vetting committees: Tefaf is overhauling its vetting committee policy, completely dropping art dealers and auction house specialists from the process. 

06.11.2018, The Art NewspaperTefaf drops dealers and auction house specialists from vetting committees  

Italy’s Populist Government Introduces Strict New Laws to Crack Down on Art Crime: Italy’s populist government will introduce harsh new penalties for art and antiquities crimes, prioritizing the preservation of its rich culture as a key part of its nationalist policies. 

06.11.2018, ArtnetItaly’s Populist Government Introduces Strict New Laws to Crack Down on Art Crime  

Long-lost Tudor tapestry could be saved for the UK: A highly significant object—in terms of English history, art and propaganda—has re-emerged in London, having mysteriously vanished from the royal collection in the early 19th century. The Burning of the Heathen Books, a 20ft-long tapestry shot through with gold, was commissioned by Henry VIII for Hampton Court Palace in 1536. Last month, it travelled to the UK from Spain temporarily for conservation by the S. Franses Gallery, leading textile specialists. We understand that an attempt may be made to save the tapestry for the nation. 

05.11.2018, The Art NewspaperLong-lost Tudor tapestry could be saved for the UK  

Angry Neighbors Sue Tate Modern Over Nosy Visitors Looking Inside Their Luxury Apartments: If you’ve visited Tate Modern’s top-floor viewing platform to enjoy panoramic views of London, it is hard to overlook the luxury apartment block next door. Residents unhappy since the museum’s mega-extension opened in 2016 now have their day in court, arguing that the Tate’s viewing terrace is an “invasion of privacy.” 

05.11.2018, ArtnetAngry Neighbors Sue Tate Modern Over Nosy Visitors Looking Inside Their Luxury Apartments  

United States

How Does a Museum Buy an Artwork That Doesn’t Physically Exist?: The Hirshhorn Museum’s purchase of a piece by Tino Sehgal reveals a different kind of acquisition process. 

08.11.2018, The New York Times Style MagazineHow Does a Museum Buy an Artwork That Doesn’t Physically Exist?  

Washington, DC grant-making commission issues morality clause—then quickly backtracks: The Washington-based DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities (DCCAH) flirted with censorship this week, adding a restrictive amendment onto a contract for grantees and then withdrawing it three days later. 

08.11.2018, The Art NewspaperWashington, DC grant-making commission issues morality clause—then quickly backtracks  

08.11.2018, ArtnetAfter Outcry, the Mayor of DC Overrules the Local Grant-Giving Organization’s Attempt to Restrict ‘Lewd or Political’ Work  

Contemporary art’s value may be on the rise, but it comes at a greater cost: Chicago has a bold reputation for selling off its municipal assets. The city was the first to privatise an existing toll road; it sold its 911 emergency call operation to Sumitomo Mitsui Banking; and Chicago is still subject to ceaseless public ridicule for desperately leasing its parking meter system in 2008, a 75-year deal brokered for a lump sum of $1.2bn. In Chicago, as well as in other American Cities, the privatisation of city assets is a familiar scheme of sale-and-leaseback, offering tax shelters for buyers and a momentary revenue windfall for inadequate government coffers. 

08.11.2018, The Art NewspaperContemporary art’s value may be on the rise, but it comes at a greater cost  

US court orders collector to repay Sotheby’s $1.2m for Parmigianino fake: The seller of a painting of Saint Jerome that had been attributed to Parmigianino, or his followers depending on the expert, has been ordered by a federal court in New York to refund Sotheby’s after an expert report “conclusively” found that the painting was a “modern forgery”, according to the judgement. 

08.11.2018, The Art NewspaperUS court orders collector to repay Sotheby’s $1.2m for Parmigianino fake  

08.11.2018, ArtnetCollector Who Sold a Fake Old Master Through Sotheby’s Must Repay the Auction House $1.2 Million, Court Rules  

Houston museum reattributes painting to Velázquez: Until a few years ago, Kitchen Maid (around 1620)—labelled “in the style of Diego Velázquez”—hung behind a door at Rienzi, the European decorative arts house museum at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston. But when it goes back on view in mid-November at the main museum, the label will read “attributed to Velázquez”. 

07.11.2018, The Art NewspaperHouston museum reattributes painting to Velázquez  

08.11.2018, ArtnetArt Industry News: Houston Museum Discovers It Has a Velázquez Painting Hiding in Plain Sight + Other Stories  

Native American group denounces Met’s exhibition of indigenous objects: A Native American advocacy group is sharply criticising an exhibition of indigenous objects at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, contending that it violates ethical practices. Shannon O’Loughlin, the executive director of the Association on American Indian Affairs (AAIA), argues that curators “did not consult with affiliated tribal representatives to perform their due diligence, but their first mistake was to call these objects art”. 

06.11.2018, The Art NewspaperNative American group denounces Met’s exhibition of indigenous objects  

Art dealers across the US are mobilising in support of Democrats ahead of US mid-term elections: On Monday morning, nearing the end of what is likely the most heated mid-term election cycle in modern history, a busload of around 50 volunteers left from Karma gallery in New York’s East Village. The artists, art world professionals and friends of the gallery aboard the bus were headed for Staten Island to knock on doors for the Democratic candidate for Congress, Max Rose, who has a strong chance of unseating the incumbent Republican representative, Dan Donovan, in Tuesday’s elections. 

06.11.2018, The Art NewspaperArt dealers across the US are mobilising in support of Democrats ahead of US mid-term elections  

Looted vessels returned at event marking 15 years of US-Italy art crime fighting co-operation: Twenty looted ancient artefacts, recovered by US officials and soon to be returned to Italy, were on display at the Italian Embassy in Washington, DC last week, to celebrate 15 years of co-operation between the two countries in fighting art crime. Among the works to be repatriated are three ancient Greek vessels that officials said were illicitly removed from an archaeological site in Italy and smuggled into the US. Carabinieri officers spotted the items listed for sale online at an unnamed auction house in New York and alerted the FBI, which helped recover the objects. 

06.11.2018, The Art NewspaperLooted vessels returned at event marking 15 years of US-Italy art crime fighting co-operation  

Thailand Is Ramping Up Efforts to Recover Cultural Heritage From US Museums, Including the Met: Thailand has stepped up its efforts to reclaim bronze and stone sculptures that have been in US museum collections for decades. The Kingdom of Thailand’s culture minister announced last week that the country is seeking the return of 23 antiquities, some of which have been housed in the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena, and New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art since the late 1960s. 

06.11.2018, ArtnetThailand Is Ramping Up Efforts to Recover Cultural Heritage From US Museums, Including the Met  

World

Louvre Abu Dhabi tops one million visitors in its first year: The Louvre Abu Dhabi, which celebrates its first birthday on Sunday (11 November), has welcomed more than one million visitors, according to Mohamed Khalifa Al Mubarak, the chairman of the Emirate’s Department of Culture and Tourism. The figure is a jump from the predicted 800,000 visitors museum officials originally said they hoped to attract. 

09.11.2018, The Art NewspaperLouvre Abu Dhabi tops one million visitors in its first year  

Has the market for art fairs become saturated?: Exhibition organiser MCH Group, whose events include the prestigious Art Basel, has taken the art market by surprise with news of a U-turn on its strategy to invest in regional art fairs. As part of a refocusing and cost-cutting exercise, the group is now selling its 60.3 per cent stake in the India Art Fair (acquired in 2016) and a 25.1 per cent holding in Art Düsseldorf (acquired last year). The recently announced minority investment in Art SG, a new fair for Singapore in November 2019, is also off the table, though a new shareholder, the Asia fair expert Magnus Renfrew, has already stepped in. MCH’s rollout of a new event for high-spec cars, Grand Basel, is also on ice. 

09.11.2018, The Financial TimesHas the market for art fairs become saturated?  

Kerry James Marshall named most influential contemporary artist: Kerry James Marshall, the American figurative painter who set a record at auction this year for the most expensive work by a living black artist, has been judged the world’s most influential artist in an annual contemporary power list. 

09.11.2018, The GuardianKerry James Marshall named most influential contemporary artist  

Russian billionaire Dmitri Rybolovlev charged in corruption probe brought by Monaco police: After being detained overnight by police in Monaco, Russian billionaire Dmitri Rybolovlev was charged yesterday (8 November) based on claims that he attempted to influence senior Monegasque authorities involved in his ongoing dispute with the Swiss art dealer Yves Bouvier. 

09.11.2018, The Art NewspaperRussian billionaire Dmitri Rybolovlev charged in corruption probe brought by Monaco police  

08.11.2018, The Sunday TimesRussian tycoon Dmitry Rybolovlev charged over Monaco corruption case  

Lost Art: when works disappear into private collections: Before the 18th century, art that was commissioned for private spaces would disappear the moment it passed from the hands of the artist to those of the owner. Collectors could then do with it what they liked. Some loaned works for public display, but that is more of a 19th- and 20th-century phenomenon. Most displayed the works in some personal setting, a bedroom wall or a sitting room, and so the object was no longer available to the wider world, aside from the intimates and invited guests of the owner. But these works were technically still “extant”, which in art history terms means that their location was accounted for. They could be in private homes or in Swiss bank vaults, but the same term is used, whether or not scholars or members of the public could visit the objects if they wished. 

08.11.2018, The Art NewspaperLost Art: when works disappear into private collections  

Grand Egyptian Museum pushes full opening to 2020: The opening of the long-delayed Grand Egyptian Museum (GEM) near the Pyramids of Giza has slid again, to 2020. As recently as June, officials said the museum would open partially in 2019 for the unveiling of its star attraction—all 5,400 objects from the tomb of King Tutankhamun. The full opening was expected to follow in 2022, the centenary of Howard Carter’s discovery of the boy pharaoh’s tomb. The Egyptian government’s new ambition is for the entire 490,000 sq. m complex to open in 2020, says Tarek Tawfik, GEM’s director. The museum was first announced in 1992 and initially scheduled to open in 2012. 

08.11.2018, The Art NewspaperGrand Egyptian Museum pushes full opening to 2020  

Shanghai’s two rapidly expanding fairs—Art021 and West Bund Art and Design—are attracting dealers despite China’s slowing economy: Shanghai’s art scene is precocious. Just over five years ago, it had no big contemporary art fairs; now there are two fast-growing events in the same week—Art021 and West Bund Art and Design (8-11 November)—drawing galleries that, though veteran fair exhibitors, are ingénues in China. And, curiously, many choose to try both fairs at once. 

07.11.2018, The Art NewspaperShanghai’s two rapidly expanding fairs—Art021 and West Bund Art and Design—are attracting dealers despite China’s slowing economy  

09.11.2018, ArtnetDespite China’s Wavering Economy, Shanghai’s Duo of Fairs Proves Worth the Trip for Star International Galleries  

How will algorithms change the art market?: Debate over the role of technology in the art market has exploded this year. Portion, an auction house that accepts only cryptocurrency, was launched last month. Before that there was the emergence of Codex Protocol, a new registry for fine art, wine and collectibles based on blockchain technology. Even the 252-year-old auction house Christie’s has got in on the act. At its inaugural “Art and Tech” summit this summer, it explored questions that had more to do with new technologies than Old Masters. “What is blockchain, really?” was the title of one event.  

07.11.2018, The Financial TimesHow will algorithms change the art market?  

Why is art so expensive?: Christie’s recently sold an AI-generated painting for $432,500. The piece, titled “Portrait of Edmond Belamy,” was made by Obvious, a French art collective, and sold for roughly 45 times its estimated worth. 

31.10.2018, VoxWhy is art so expensive?  

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