12 August 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Monet’s Venetian Doge’s Palace painting blocked from leaving the UK: Arts minister Rebecca Pow placed the temporary bar on the picture after an export application was made. The painting was sold at Sotheby’s Impressionist & Modern art auction in London on February 26 for a hammer price of £24m.

09.08.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Monet’s Venetian Doge’s Palace painting blocked from leaving the UK 

Growing pressure on the British Museum as Jamaica is latest government seeking return of objects: The British Museum in London is facing further restitution claims after a Jamaican government minister called for ancient artefacts in its collection to be returned. Jamaican officials are seeking the repatriation of a 500-year-old carved wooden figure representing a rain god and a carved figure of a bird-man spirit made by the Taíno indigenous people.

08.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Growing pressure on the British Museum as Jamaica is latest government seeking return of objects 

08.08.2019, Artnet: Jamaica Joins a Growing Number of Nations Calling on the British Museum to Repatriate Its Cultural Artifacts 

Over 18,000 cultural goods seized and 59 people arrested in trafficking sting: Police authorities from 29 countries have seized 18,000 items and arrested 59 individuals in an international crackdown on the trafficking of stolen cultural artefacts.

07.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Over 18,000 cultural goods seized and 59 people arrested in trafficking sting 

08.08.2019, Egypt Today: EU seizes 18K stolen artefacts including Egyptian pieces 

Eight months on from Sarr Savoy and still waiting: Since the release of the Sarr Savoy Report at the end of November (over eight months ago), there has not been the feared avalanche of returns to Africa of artefacts from French public collections. Far from it. In fact, the latest public actions on the part of the French government seem to show a retreat from the propositions of the report. As The Art Newspaper reported last month, a low-key conference in Paris included a statement by the French culture minister that ‘France will examine all requests presented by African nations’, suggesting that claimants ‘not focus on the sole issue of restitution’. A far cry from the numerous ‘swift restitutions’ proposed by authors Bénédicte Savoy and Felwine Sarr in their November report.

07.08.2019, The Institute of Art and Law: Eight months on from Sarr Savoy and still waiting

Munich Museums Restitute Nazi-Looted Artworks: Three museums in Munich returned nine artworks to the heirs of Julius and Semaya Franziska Davidsohn, Jewish collectors who were persecuted by the Nazis during World War II, at a ceremony held at the Bavarian National Museum on Monday, August 5. The works—five paintings, three prints, and a wooden panel with ivory reliefs—were confiscated from the couple’s apartment in Munich in 1938 and found their way into the collections of the Bavarian State Painting Collections, the Bavarian National Museum, and the State Collections of Prints and Drawings in 1955.

06.08.2019, Artforum: Munich Museums Restitute Nazi-Looted Artworks

05.08.2019, Artnet: Three Munich Museums Restitute 9 Nazi-Looted Artworks to the Heirs of Jewish Collectors 

Recovered: Almost half a century after it was stolen the Portrait of Admiral Charles Fanshawe comes home: In September 1971 six portraits were stolen during a burglary at the Valence House Museum in the London Borough of Barking and Dagenham. Shortly after the thefts, law enforcement recovered two of the art works and all 6 frames but over the next four decades the investigation would grind to a standstill with no further recoveries.

06.08.2019, ARCA: Recovered: Almost half a century after it was stolen the Portrait of Admiral Charles Fanshawe comes home 

Long-running Facebook battle over censored Courbet painting gets happy ending: A French street art association is the unexpected beneficiary in the years-long legal battle brought by the French schoolteacher Frédéric Durand-Baïssas against Facebook over censorship claims. The Paris-based group Le Mur (The Wall), which works with artists including A1One and BK Foxx, is due to receive an undisclosed amount from the social media giant, bringing the eight-year lawsuit to an end.

06.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Long-running Facebook battle over censored Courbet painting gets happy ending 05.08.2019, Artnet: After an 8-Year Legal Battle, Facebook Ends Its Dispute With a French School Teacher Who Posted Courbet’s ‘Origin of the World’

United States

HBO Used an Acclaimed Artist’s Slenderman Painting Without Permission, Treating It as Fan Art. Now the Case Could Head to Trial: A Brooklyn-based artist is suing HBO for using his painting of Slenderman in a documentary on the fictional creature without his permission. The network claims its treatment of the work qualifies as fair use. Last week, Judge Margo Brodie rejected HBO’s motion to dismiss the case, clearing the way for it to proceed to trial.

09.08.2019, Artnet: HBO Used an Acclaimed Artist’s Slenderman Painting Without Permission, Treating It as Fan Art. Now the Case Could Head to Trial 

Art foundation asks state to investigate management of Robert Indiana estate: The foundation that represents the artwork of Robert Indiana, including his iconic “LOVE” image, is asking the Maine Attorney General’s Office to investigate the late artist’s estate, alleging it has mismanaged its finances and Indiana’s legacy.

08.08.2019, The Portland Press Herald: Art foundation asks state to investigate management of Robert Indiana estate 

Lawmakers Push for a National Museum of Asian Pacific American History and Culture: A new bill from congresswoman Grace Meng, a democrat from Queens, calls on the Smithsonian to consider opening a National Museum of Asian Pacific American History and Culture. The proposed institution would honor the history, accomplishments, and culture of Americans of Asian and Pacific Islander descent, such as Chinese laborers on the transcontinental railroad, Filipino agricultural workers who helped lead the farm worker revolution, and the Japanese American incarceration during World War II.

07.08.2019, Artnet: Lawmakers Push for a National Museum of Asian Pacific American History and Culture 

French Collector Sues Dealer, Insurance Companies, Alleging Damage to $22.5 M. Brancusi Sculpture: In a suit filed last Monday in New York Supreme Court, a French collector alleged that two insurance companies, as well as a prominent financier-dealer and his businesses, owe him millions for damage done to a Constantin Brancusi sculpture he owns.

06.08.2019, Art News: French Collector Sues Dealer, Insurance Companies, Alleging Damage to $22.5 M. Brancusi Sculpture 

07.08.2019, Artnet: A Brancusi Sculpture Fell Off a Pedestal in the Office of an Art-Financing Company. Its Owner Is Suing for $22.5 Million 

Fourth Sotheby’s shareholder files lawsuit in bid to block $3.7bn sale to Patrick Drahi: A fourth Sotheby’s shareholder, Phillip Stevens, is suing the auction house in an attempt to halt its sale to the French-Israeli media and telecom entrepreneur Patrick Drahi in a deal worth $3.7bn.

06.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Fourth Sotheby’s shareholder files lawsuit in bid to block $3.7bn sale to Patrick Drahi 06.08.2019, Artnet: Sotheby’s Is Hit With Its Fourth Shareholder Lawsuit in a Month Over Its Acquisition Deal With Patrick Drahi

World

Can performance art be owned? Why the genre is often missing in museum collections: The Tate in Britain, along with the Museum of Modern Art and the Guggenheim in New York, are leading collectors of performance work, but the acquisition of it is not common at most museums and has become more popular within only the last 15 years. Generally, collectible performance work is considered editioned work, so multiple institutions can own the same work and the rights to perform it as often as they wish.

08.08.2019, The Los Angeles Times: Can performance art be owned? Why the genre is often missing in museum collections 

Artists wade into row over Japanese triennial that censored its own show on censorship: More than 70 artists participating in the Aichi Triennale in central Japan have signed a statement demanding that an exhibition dedicated to freedom of speech re-opens after appropriate security measures are put in place.07.08.2019, The Art Newspaper: Artists wade into row over Japanese triennial that censored its own show on censorship

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