10 June 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Picasso Painting Once the Subject of Nazi-Loot Lawsuit to Appear at Zurich Art Weekend: A Pablo Picasso painting that was the subject of a heated legal battle 15 years ago will go on view in Switzerland next week at Hauser & Wirth gallery’s Zurich space. The painting, Femme en Blanc, 1922, is being loaned to the gallery for the exhibition “Louise Bourgeois & Pablo Picasso: Anatomies of Desire.”

06.06.2019, Art News: Picasso Painting Once the Subject of Nazi-Loot Lawsuit to Appear at Zurich Art Weekend 

A man who tried to sell a fake Lucian Freud painting on eBay was sentenced: The case of Vincent Dyer—the man who attempted to sell a fake Lucian Freud painting for £3,000 ($3,800) on eBay—has taken another turn. The original painting, a 1952 portrait of Freud’s friend and fellow painter Francis Bacon now valued in the millions, was stolen from the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin in 1988 and has never been recovered.

05.06.2019, Artsy: A man who tried to sell a fake Lucian Freud painting on eBay was sentenced. 

03.06.2019, The Evening Standard: Conman who tried to sell fake Lucian Freud portrait for £3,000 on eBay facing prison 

British Museum delegates travel to Easter Island to discuss fate of statues: A spokeswoman for the British Museum told CNN: “The Museum is delighted to have sent representatives to visit Rapa Nui and to return the courtesy extended by the visit of the group from Rapa Nui in November 2018. We hope we will be able to continue the cordial and productive discussions begun last November and to further develop and build relationships with people on the island.”

04.06.2019, CNN Style: British Museum delegates travel to Easter Island to discuss fate of statues 

Court case over three Derain paintings will test France’s promise to speed up Nazi-era claims: France has long been accused of dragging its feet on the restitution of Nazi-era loot. According to a French government report published last year, France’s policies are characterised by “time delays” and “weak responses and inaction”. France pledged to improve research in this area at an international conference in Berlin last December and is setting up a taskforce to tackle some of these issues. But a major court case will put these assurances to the test.03.06.2019, The Art Newspaper: Court case over three Derain paintings will test France’s promise to speed up Nazi-era claims

United States

An Artist Is Suing the Hole Gallery and Mamacha Cafe for Tens of Thousands of Dollars in Unpaid Fees and Lost and Damaged Art: The Dallas-based artist Dan Lam is suing The Hole and Mamacha, a matcha cafe that operates within the New York City gallery, for allegedly failing to pay her for sculptures they sold during a 2018 exhibition, for failing to return unsold ones, and for damaging others.

10.06.2019, Artnet: An Artist Is Suing the Hole Gallery and Mamacha Cafe for Tens of Thousands of Dollars in Unpaid Fees and Lost and Damaged Art 

FBI art heist agent says missing Gardner works may not be in U.S.: The head of the FBI’s art crime squad said he’s not sure if all 13 pieces stolen from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum on the Fenway are in the United States.

FBI Special Agent Tim Carpenter, who heads the bureau’s Art Crime Team, told legal news website Law & Crime the stolen artworks could “perhaps” be in the U.S. or abroad.

08.06.2019, The Boston Herald: FBI art heist agent says missing Gardner works may not be in U.S. 

‘Imagine What Frida Would Think of This’: Colorado-Based Artist Sues Frida Kahlo Corporation for Right to Sell Dolls Depicting Famed Surrealist: In recent years, multiple lawsuits have dealt with the question of who truly owns Frida Kahlo’s image and name. This week, these debates have surfaced once again in a new lawsuit filed by an artist based in Colorado.

07.06.2019, Art News: ‘Imagine What Frida Would Think of This’: Colorado-Based Artist Sues Frida Kahlo Corporation for Right to Sell Dolls Depicting Famed Surrealist 

Park Official Violated Procurement Regulations to Buy Art: An unidentified National Park Service official participated in buying a $39,000 painting for a national park in a scheme that helped the artist avoid a federal tax garnishment, an Interior Department inspector general report released June 7 found.

07.06.2019, Bloomberg Environment: Park Official Violated Procurement Regulations to Buy Art

Joel Silver and Gagosian Gallery Settle Fight Over $8 M. Koons Sculpture—Acquisition to Move Forward: Film producer Joel Silver and Gagosian gallery are ending their legal battle over an $8 million Jeff Koons sculpture whose delivery date Silver had alleged had been pushed back repeatedly. After fighting for a year to get $3.2 million in payments for the piece returned, Silver has joined with Gagosian in a settlement, and the Die Hard producer will apparently be acquiring a 2013–15 Balloon Venus Hohlen Fels sculpture after all. 

06.06.2019, Art News: Joel Silver and Gagosian Gallery Settle Fight Over $8 M. Koons Sculpture—Acquisition to Move Forward 

06.06.2019, Artnet: Hollywood Producer Joel Silver Dropped His Lawsuit Against Gagosian After His Secret Billionaire Backer Was Uncovered 

‘Selling everything but the wallpaper’—auction reopens old wounds over Barnes legacy: While the Barnes Foundation continues a $100m funding campaign towards its centenary celebrations in 2022, two smaller transactions—a $98,000 auction of objects and a $100 lease of its former suburban headquarters for 30 years—raise questions about the institution’s commitment to the legacy of its founder, Albert C. Barnes.03.06.2019, The Art Newspaper: ‘Selling everything but the wallpaper’—auction reopens old wounds over Barnes legacy

World

In Iraq Museum, There Are Things ‘That Are Nowhere Else in the World’: If people remember anything about the Iraq Museum, it is most likely the televised images of it being looted in 2003 as American troops watched from their tanks. In addition to trying to get back the pieces that were looted (some 4,300 have been recovered), the challenge now is to make the museum accessible to as many Iraqis as possible, said Abdulameer al-Hamdani, the recently appointed Iraqi culture minister.

09.06.2019, The New York Times: In Iraq Museum, There Are Things ‘That Are Nowhere Else in the World’ 

The Nuclear Bomb Tests of the 1940s Can Help Identify Forged Paintings, a New Study Says: Researchers have found that a new way of using radiocarbon dating—a technique developed in the 1940s that can date cave paintings and human remains, among other things—can help determine the authenticity of famous works of art.

06.06.2019, Artnet: The Nuclear Bomb Tests of the 1940s Can Help Identify Forged Paintings, a New Study Says 

Why Reggae Deserves International Protection: Late last year, 50 years after the first popular reggae song – Toots and the Maytals’s ‘Do the Reggay’ – was released, the musical genre was added to a list of international cultural treasures by UNESCO, meaning that the United Nations deems it worthy of protection and promotion. Since its founding, reggae music – and by extension Jamaica – has amassed an immeasurable cultural and social currency worldwide, yet largely speaking, it has not received the institutional and public recognition it deserves.   05.06.2019, Frieze: Why Reggae Deserves International Protection

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