1 October 2018

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Hard, soft or no-deal: how the UK art market is preparing for Brexit: Much debate continues to fill the opinion columns on the likely impact of Brexit, with the possibility of a no-deal dominating current discussions and unnerving businesses. As with other markets, the UK and Europe’s art trade has been held in a state of prolonged uncertainty, an uncertainty now shifting to rising unease at the spectre of March’s looming deadline. 

26.09.2018, The Art NewspaperHard, soft or no-deal: how the UK art market is preparing for Brexit 

Swedish museums call for panel to advise on Nazi-loot claims: Sweden’s museums are calling on the government to create an independent panel to issue recommendations on claims for art in public collections that was lost due to persecution by the Nazis, in keeping with its commitments under the 1998 Washington Principles. 

25.09.2018, The Art NewspaperSwedish museums call for panel to advise on Nazi-loot claims 

Copyright case brought by Naf Naf creative director against Jeff Koons finally comes to court: A legal row that began in late 2014, when Jeff Koons was accused of plagiarising a famous advertising campaign by the French clothing brand Naf Naf, is likely to be settled next month. The case was finally heard in a Paris court on 24 September, almost four years after the allegations were first aired. 

26.09.2018, The Art NewspaperCopyright case brought by Naf Naf creative director against Jeff Koons finally comes to court 

Red tape is stifling German auctions: German auction houses are struggling with increased bureaucracy and a shortage of high-quality consignments after the introduction of the country’s cultural heritage protection law in 2016 by the culture minister Monica Gruetters. Some have even relocated auctions abroad to circumvent stringent import and export restrictions. 

17.09.2018, The Art NewspaperRed tape is stifling German auctions 

Looted ‘cannibal’ bowl served up in Royal Academy of Art’s Oceania show: The Royal Academy of Arts in London is to present one of its ambitious world cultures exhibitions this week—on Oceania. With around 200 works, the show will be the largest Oceania exhibition since 1979, at Washington, DC’s National Gallery of Art. Loans of historical material will mainly be from UK and European museums. US museums were largely avoided, since their collections have less established provenances, but important loans are coming from museums in Auckland and Wellington. 

24.09.2018, The Art NewspaperLooted ‘cannibal’ bowl served up in Royal Academy of Art’s Oceania show 

25.09.2018, The Financial Times‘Oceania’ art exhibition set to open at London’s Royal Academy  

Sotheby’s cancels Viel Castel sale after entire collection is bought by a US collector, source says: Sotheby’s Paris was the setting for a surreal scene on 12 September, when the collection of the Count and Countess Viel Castel was cancelled two and a half hours after it was supposed to have started. Although no reason has been given by the auction house, according to a source the collection was sold in its entirety to an American collector. 

24.09.2018, The Art NewspaperSotheby’s cancels Viel Castel sale after entire collection is bought by a US collector, source says 

How two missing legs helped the restitution of an Italian secrétaire worth €2m: A secrétaire by the 18th-century Italian cabinet maker Pietro Piffetti (1701-77) has been restituted to the Italian state by a private Swiss collector who inherited it. When it was presented in July at Turin’s Palazzo Chiablese, General Fabrizio Parrulli of the Carabinieri Command for the Protection of Cultural Heritage said: “We prevent crime, but we also exercise cultural diplomacy, persuading people that it is right that a work of art returns home.” 

19.09.2018, The Art NewspaperHow two missing legs helped the restitution of an Italian secrétaire worth €2m 

United States

Chinese art and antiquities spared from Trump’s tariffs: The trade war between the US and China continues to rise in pitch after President Donald Trump announced that a 10% tariff would be imposed on $200bn worth of Chinese goods starting 24 September. US-based art and antiquities dealers, however, are breathing a small sigh of relief. 

18.09.2018, The Art NewspaperChinese art and antiquities spared from Trump’s tariffs 

24.09.2018, Antiques Trade GazetteTrade lobbying helps win reprieve on US imports of Chinese art and antiques  

19.09.2018, ArtnetThe Latest Round of Trump Administration Tariffs Spares Chinese Art and Antiquities 

Who Owns Graffiti? A Judge Allows a Street Artist’s Lawsuit Against General Motors to Move Forward: The Swiss street artist Adrian Falkner, also known as Smash 137, will have his day in court with General Motors. A federal judge in Los Angeles has rejected GM’s attempt to dismiss the artist’s claim that the automaker infringed on his copyright when it included a photo of one of his murals in its 2016 Cadillac ad campaign. 

21.09.2018, ArtnetWho Owns Graffiti? A Judge Allows a Street Artist’s Lawsuit Against General Motors to Move Forward 

The Getty to Start a Research Center for African-American Art: African-American art history resources could be described as something of a diaspora: Early letters by an important artist might be held at one university, her most prominent exhibition materials filed away at a museum, and notebooks and sketchbooks still stashed away in the artist’s studio. Today the Getty Research Institute is announcing a new program to help bring the pieces together: The African American Art History Initiative. 

25.09.2018, The New York TimesThe Getty to Start a Research Center for African-American Art 

25.09.2018, The Art NewspaperGetty acquires archive of Betye Saar 

26.09.2018, ArtnetThe Getty Kicks Off an Ambitious New African American Art History Initiative by Acquiring Betye Saar’s Archive 

Max Hollein on How the Met Will Redefine the Entire Way We Think About Contemporary Art: Last Friday, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art announced that it was planning to vacate the so-called Met Breuer three years early, handing the Brutalist building over the the Frick in 2020, it was clear that a decision was finally taking shape around one of the most vexing quandaries facing the Met: How can the venerable encyclopedic institution, with works stretching back to the earliest recorded human creations, meaningfully embrace contemporary art without giving off the vibe of a graying relative desperately trying to act cool? 

25.09.2018, ArtnetMax Hollein on How the Met Will Redefine the Entire Way We Think About Contemporary Art

World

Every Crisis Is an Opportunity’: The Turkish Art Market Holds Its Head High, Despite Political Upheaval and a Currency in Free Fall: When the Turkish lira went into free fall this August, dealer Moiz Zilberman was disappointed but not surprised. The gallerist, collector, and businessman has also studied economics, and so he was fully bracing for the financial downturn. “I was telling everyone,” says Zilberman, who runs a gallery with branches in both Istanbul and Berlin. 

24.09.2018, Artnet‘Every Crisis Is an Opportunity’: The Turkish Art Market Holds Its Head High, Despite Political Upheaval and a Currency in Free Fall 

Beirut Art Fair gives helping hand to embattled Egyptian galleries: A cluster of Egyptian galleries at this year’s Beirut Art Fair (until 23 September) in Lebanon reflected a modest but coordinated effort to help those in both countries overcome financial hurdles, organisers say. Four Egyptian galleries took part, with work ranging from wittily reworked traditional tarboosh hats, or fezzes, by the Italian artist Carmine Cartolano, aka Quarm Qartfor $600-$900 from Mashrabia Gallery, to works by the Egyptian sculptor Adam Henein (including the $75,000 Fish) with Cairo’s Karim Francis Contemporary. 

24.09.2018, The Art NewspaperBeirut Art Fair gives helping hand to embattled Egyptian galleries 

The First Bangkok Art Biennial Will Fill the City’s Ancient Temples With Art by Yayoi Kusama and Other Contemporary Stars: Thailand’s first-ever Bangkok Art Biennale touches down next month with a slate of 75 artists hailing from 33 countries. They’ll be presenting their work at 20 sites across the city, including site-specific works at several ancient temples that will be hosting contemporary art for the very first time. 

19.09.2018, ArtnetThe First Bangkok Art Biennial Will Fill the City’s Ancient Temples With Art by Yayoi Kusama and Other Contemporary Stars 

Salvator Mundi’s patchwork provenance now includes a 50-year stop in Louisiana: As Louvre Abu Dhabi unveils Leonardo’s painting of the Salvator Mundi this month, fresh evidence has emerged that throws into question the early whereabouts of the painting and its royal pedigree. 

19.09.2018, The Art NewspaperSalvator Mundi’s patchwork provenance now includes a 50-year stop in Louisiana

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