03 June 2019

Art@Law | Constantine Cannon

Europe

Consultation on the trade in non-elephant ivory launched by government: A consultation into the trade of non-elephant ivory has been launched to find out whether the government should take further action to restrict the trade in ivory.

30.05.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Consultation on the trade in non-elephant ivory launched by government

Jose Berardo in hot water over alleged €1bn debt: The vast modern and contemporary art collection of José “Joe” Berardo, the Madeira-born collector once dubbed the “Portuguese Saatchi”, is at stake after three Portuguese banks filed a lawsuit to recover debts from the businessman totalling almost €1bn.

30.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: Jose Berardo in hot water over alleged €1bn debt 

Speculation mounts over whether Louvre in Paris will label Salvator Mundi as a ‘workshop’ picture: The question regarding the authorship of Leonardo’s ‘Salvator Mundi’, the world’s most expensive painting, has again been the subject of media attention this week after it was claimed that experts at the Louvre in Paris are reluctant to exhibit it as a fully autograph work.

30.05.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Speculation mounts over whether Louvre in Paris will label Salvator Mundi as a ‘workshop’ picture 

27.05.2019, The Sunday Times: Louvre faces $450m question over last Leonardo 

02.06.2019, The Guardian: Leonardo da Vinci expert declines to back Salvator Mundi as his painting 

Is That a $123 Million Da Vinci the Swiss Won’t Hand Over?: A contentious 16th-century painting of a marquess once put on sale for a reported $123 million that may have been painted by Da Vinci won’t be headed back to Italy any time soon after Switzerland’s top court ruled its owner didn’t import it illegally.

29.05.2019, Bloomberg: Is That a $123 Million Da Vinci the Swiss Won’t Hand Over?

British Museum must recognise its own powers in matters of restitution: The case of Ethiopian tabots shows that trustees’ hands are not tied when it comes to the disposal of certain items from the collection.

29.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: British Museum must recognise its own powers in matters of restitution 

Italy’s new ruins: heritage sites being lost to neglect and looting: A neglected corner of Sicily is just one of hundreds of abandoned archaeological sites, monuments and historical buildings across Italy. The country boasts the highest number of Unesco world heritage sites in the world, but according to EU statistics is second-last in Europe for public funding of culture. As a consequence, parts of its immense heritage – which have survived earthquakes and wars – risk being lost to vandalism, negligence and looting.

28.05.2019, The Guardian: Italy’s new ruins: heritage sites being lost to neglect and looting

More grief for Aristophil investors as French government seizes hundreds of documents: Around 18,000 people invested in the now bankrupted company’s manuscripts collection, but the state says many items of historical importance should never have been sold. Under French law, these papers are public property and are confiscated without compensation.

28.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: More grief for Aristophil investors as French government seizes hundreds of documents 

Antique weapons will be permitted in the post: A significant amendment means that the new law governing the sale of bladed items will not impact buyers of antique weapons as once feared.27.05.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Antique weapons will be permitted in the post

United States

Art dealers filed a motion to dismiss Cady Noland’s lawsuit over her log cabin work.: For the last five years, a legal saga has been unfolding over a single question: whether a log cabin is still Log Cabin Blank With Screw Eyes and Cafe Door (1990), an artwork by Cady Noland. One of the most expensive living female artists, Noland also has one of 2019’s most talked-about exhibitions.

30.05.2019, Artsy: Art dealers filed a motion to dismiss Cady Noland’s lawsuit over her log cabin work. 

From Mapplethorpe to Iowa, through New Hampshire and California: US rules on obscenity and nudity in art: The story begins in New Hampshire in 1942, when a ground-breaking precedent was set: the freedom of expression right granted by the constitution of the United States was not absolute. Judge Murphy, presiding on a case that actually centred on fighting words, meaning speech that is aimed at inciting violence or hatred, ruled that there were some exceptions to the 1st Amendment protection, of which fighting words were one and obscenity was another.

29.05.2019, The Institute of Art and Law: From Mapplethorpe to Iowa, through New Hampshire and California: US rules on obscenity and nudity in art 

Call on antiques trade to oppose tariffs on Chinese antiques once again: Last year, after arguing a strong case, the art trade succeeded in having Chinese art removed from the US government’s tariff list. However, Chinese works of art – defined as “exceeding 100 years, paintings, drawings and sculpture” – are again on a new list of $300bn-plus of imports drawn up by US trade authorities. They would be subject to a 25% tariff, regardless of the port of origin.27.05.2019, The Antiques Trade Gazette: Call on antiques trade to oppose tariffs on Chinese antiques once again

World

Art Busan hopes to dodge US-China trade war crossfire: The fair’s director Seokho Jeong insists South Korea’s art market remains energetic despite an economy caught in the US-China trade war crossfire. “Korea’s art market continues to develop and improve with new channels of presenting and collecting art,” he says. “Two major auction houses, K-Auction and Seoul Auction, are actively expanding the Korean art market, along with Art Busan and KIAF [Seoul’s Korea International Art Fair], Korea’s top two art fairs.” He adds that Korean collectors are now a staple of the global market and says “the [South] Korean economy is one of the most stable and developed in Asia and also globally, with a GDP per head of almost US$40,000.”31.05.2019, The Art Newspaper: Art Busan hopes to dodge US-China trade war crossfire

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